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Irish Genealogy News - 2012 Developments 

Hi Folks! Hope you had a great holiday. Looking forward to a happy 2012, there are several encouraging signs for those of us interested in Irish genealogy.

There is a growing feeling in Ireland that making it easier for its Diaspora to find their Irish roots will encourage tourism. The thinking is that if more people can identify their ancestors, they will visit their ancestral homes. With the financial trials in Ireland the last few years, enhancing tourism is an important issue. Here’s some examples of initiatives that are under way:

• Ireland Reaching Out Project
(http://www.irelandxo.com)
o “The Ireland Reaching Out (Ireland XO) project is based on a simple idea; instead of waiting for people of Irish descent to trace their roots, we go the other way. Working through voluntary effort at a townland, village and parish level here in Ireland, we identify who left, and trace them and their descendants worldwide, proactively engaging with them and inviting them to become part of an extended “virtual” community with their place of origin.”
o “The national pilot project of Ireland XO was developed in South-East Galway from October 2010 through to July 2011 culminating in a hugely successful inaugural Week of Welcomes event held in the area in late June. The project is now expanding out of South-East Galway to a number of pilot project areas from Donegal to Kerry in preparation for a full national roll-out in 2012/2013.”

• 1926 Irish Census
o The 1901 & 1911 Irish censuses are available (free) at the National Archives site, http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie. These are wonderful resources and many born in the 1830s can be found in the 1901 Census.
o The next census in Ireland after 1911 was taken in 1926, which was the first census for the Irish Free State (now the Republic of Ireland).
o An Irish law declares a 100 year waiting period before a census can be made public. There is effort towards passing legislation to allow the 1926 Census to be made available as soon as possible instead of waiting until 2026. The new Irish government that took over last year was backing this move, but I haven’t heard where this stands.
o Northern Ireland also did a census in 1926, but I don’t know of any initiative to move up its availability.

• Irish Army Archives (www.militaryarchives.ie)
o Historical documents from 1913-1921 will be available soon (~March 2012). This period includes the 1916 Easter Rising and the War of Independence.

• The Gathering 2013 (http://www.gatheringireland.com/ - not much at this site yet)
o “The main focus of The Gathering will be a series of flagship festivals throughout the year, both existing and new, along with special interest spin-off events, designed to showcase Irish arts, food, sports, genealogy, family heritage, learning, science and hospitality. The initiative will be officially launched with The main focus of The Gathering will be a series of flagship festivals throughout the year, both existing and new, along with special interest spin-off events, designed to showcase Irish arts, food, sports, genealogy, family heritage, learning, science and hospitality. The initiative will be officially launched with a number of special events on St. Patrick’s Day.” - http://www.irishcentral.com/news/Ireland-announces-a-global-Irish-homecoming-for-2013-131382033.html

Take Care,
Dennis

Irish Genealogy News - US Civil War 

Hi!    2011 marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the U.S. Civil War (12 Apr 1861 at Fort Sumter, SC).  Did someone in your family fight in that war?   If your ancestors were in the U.S. at that time, your family was very likely affected in some way.  Below are some basic steps for researching those who served from your family.  For more info, you may want to take a look at Course I – Civil War Addendum at my website.

Identify family members who served
  • Don’t limit your search to direct ancestors. Brothers, cousins, uncles, nephews, in-laws may have served and their military records may include important family info (remember the benefits of Whole Family Research).
  • Locate the candidates in the 1860 U.S. Census (www.familysearch.org). Most served in Voluntary units which were state-based. In most cases, the state where they resided at the time of the 1860 census will be the same state where they enlisted. 
  • Locate the candidates in the following censuses, which include an indication of their veteran status:
             * 1865 NY (census of other states may include similar info) – at www.familysearch.org.  Includes unit and service dates.
             * 1890 US Veterans & Widows Schedule- at www.familysearch.org Includes unit and service dates. Deceased veterans may be included.
  • Search for your candidates in rosters of soldiers and sailors.  Civil War Soldiers and Sailors (CWSS) – at www.civilwar.nps.gov. For each soldier found, gives easy access to regimental history and basic info about each of its battles.

Procure military records and pension applications
  • The National Archives suggests that genealogists:
              * first order the pension application files (often contains great info relevant to the family history).
              * If no pension application is found, then order the compiled military service records (usually contains only info about their service record, although in some cases they do include some family history).
  • How to order a pension application file ($75 or $25)
              * Go to http://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records/pre-ww-1-records.html#natf85
              * Under Military Pension/Bounty Land Warrant Applications, click Download the Form in order to verify that you have the required information to order.
              * Under Military Pension/Bounty Land Warrant Applications, click Order Online to order.
              * You will have to choose between 2 pension options: Full Pension Application File-Civil War, 1860 or Later ($75) or Pension Documents Packet ($25)
              * The Form 85 instructions describe both options. In theory the $25 packet has the sections which most likely contain genealogical info, but you will have no indication of what you might be missing by not ordering the full option.
  • How to order a compiled military service record ($25)
              * Go to http://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records/pre-ww-1-records.html#natf86
              * Under Military Service Records, click Download the Form in order to verify that you have the required information to order.
              * Under Military Service Records, click Order Online to order.

Good Luck.

Irish Genealogy Newsletter - Military Sources 

Hi! I hope everyone is well. I have two presentations coming up, hope to see you there.

Course III - Irish Name Variations & Search Techniques This Sunday Nov 14th, 7pm, Orleans County Genealogical Society at Albion Town Hall
Irish Genealogy & Research Strategies Thursday Dec 2nd, 7pm, Irish American Cultural Institute at St. John Fisher College, Event Details

Happy Veterans Day! Here’s a reminder of some good sources to help you research military-related records.

• WWI Draft Registration. I routinely check this resource for all males who were in the US in 1917-18 and were born 1872-1900. This was just a registration – they may or may not have served. The info you will find depends on which of 3 different forms were used. All forms include address, birth date, birth place, citizenship, color of eyes and hair, relative indication of height and build.
o Available at ancestry.com. If you don’t subscribe to ancestry.com, it may be available at no cost at a local public library (available at the following libraries with your Monroe County (NY) library card: Brighton, Central/Local History Room, Fairport, Greece, Henrietta, Ogden and Penfield).
o Available at your local Family History Center. Microfilms can be ordered and rented for $5.50 each. See https://beta.familysearch.org/#form=catalog to determine the film number you need.
• 1840, 1900, 1910, 1930 US census include indication of military service. Also 1890 Veterans (& Widows) schedule in ancestry.com.
• Registers of Enlistments in the US Army, 1798-1914 includes birthplace. National Archives (NA), microfilm M233 & Ancestry.com.
Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War (SUVCW) database includes cemetery info for both Confederate and Union veterans.
• Pension records usually contain some genealogical info (including birth places and relationships). If your target person did not serve, pension records for his father, uncles, brothers and cousins could be valuable resources.
familysearch.org has Civil War Pension index cards.
How to order Older (pre-WWI) Military Service or Pension Records
How to order Post-WWI Military Service or Pension Records
• Other resources include Online Military Index www.militaryindexes.com, Civil War Soldiers www.itd.nps.gov/cwss and NYS Civil War, iarchives.nysed.gov/CivilWarWeb/search.jsp.
• For more info see Neagles, James C., U.S. Military Records, Salt Lake City, Utah: Ancestry, Inc., 1994.

For a basic intro to the military history of Ireland, see Wikipedia.

Take Care,
Dennis
www.dennisAhogan.com

© 2009-2017, Dennis A. Hogan